Amityville: The Awakening

★½☆☆ – (2017) – A small family moves into a notorious house only to find their invalid brother/son possessed by evil forces. Does what it can to link itself to the original film, but still isn’t any better than the slew of crap with “Amityville” in the title. There’s worse in this lame series, if you can call it a series, but this one turns anything potentially frightening into corn.

Honeymoon (2014)

★★★☆ – (2014) – Newlyweds vacationing in secluded woods run into trouble when the wife begins acting irrationally after strange marks appear on her body. Starts off a tad too cutesy, but gradually builds into something where anything cute has no place. A strange, gripping tale with unusual and tense advancements.

Ghost House

★½☆☆ – (2017) – An engaged couple visiting Thailand become haunted by the ghost they inadvertently piss off. While strives for horror and meaning are presented, each and every occurrence has been put to better effect in superior films. The drama is stiff while the terror often comes across as comical.

Peelers

★★½☆ – (2016) – Strip club patrons infected by a black ooze make serious trouble for strippers and their companions. Though nothing entirely unique occurs, this does provide ample nudity, ample violence, and ample fun. Colorful characters and some genuine humor render this an imperfectly good time.

Night of Something Strange

★½☆☆ – (2016) – A group of friends on a Spring Break vacation encounter a killer who spreads his murderous plague. The characters are pure stock, but the horror does try to make up for such shortcomings. Within the first half hour is necrophilia, rape, scat, tampon eating, urine drinking, and vomiting. If that sounds like fun, climb on board, if not, run from this as fast as you can.

Get Out

★★½☆ – (2017) – A black man and his white girlfriend visit her home where sadistic events involving hypnotism transpire. Incredibly unique and unnerving during the first two thirds, with the proper blends of tension and humor. Comes close to falling apart in the muddled final act, but the theme of oppression is never lost.