The Horror at 37,000 Feet

★★½☆ – (1973) – Plane passengers contend with religious cargo aboard their flight that freezes objects, oozes muck, and implants voices. Never comes close to realistic, which is fine since the deplorable shenanigans make for a truly absurd time. Has wondrous moments of ineptitude while dealing with one of the most shrill female performances in all of film.

Southbound

★★½☆ – (2015) – Anthology of intertwining stories that all have to do with the darkest sides of the ungodly. Has the same structure as Trick ‘r Treat, and though it’s not as tightly wound, this one has plenty of frights and shocks to call its own. There’s virtually no emotional connection to any single character, but what they’re put through is often grueling to watch. Not for the faint of heart.

The Nun

★★☆☆ – (2018) – A priest and a prospective nun investigate a suicide at a convent and slowly unravel a dark secret. Despite showcasing stark atmosphere and ghoulish imagery, there’s not much happening here storywise. This is by-the-numbers religious hodgepodge with an underused and unscary villain. Another Conjuring spinoff letdown.

Mandy

★★½☆ – (2018) – A mild mannered lumberjack goes after the cult that roasted his wife. The first half, while painfully slow, offers high levels of intrigue, while the second half provides all the Nicolas Cage bombast you could ever want or expect. Stylish one moment, basic the next, but always hard to look away from.

Borderland

★★★☆ – (2007) – A trio of friends looking for fun at a Mexican border town instead find themselves involved with a religious cult. Opens with a vicious bang, then builds on an involving mystery with plenty of surprises and violent shocks. Characters aren’t always the brightest, and some actions aren’t logical, but this is completely absorbing in the grittiest of ways.

The Transfiguration

★★☆☆ – (2016) – A young man who drinks the blood of his victims has a hard time maintaining a new friendship. Enjoyable for its quiet take on vampires, but feels a but too much like a film it mentions, Let the Right One In. This is also slow enough to add weight to your eyelids, but still serves as middle-tier entertainment.

Alleluia

★★★☆ – (2014) – A couple that manipulates themselves travel around to financially deceive others, yet their plans always end up in violence. Not easy to explain, which is great since it’s also difficult to know what will happen from one scene to the next. Pulls you along with a firm, psychotic grasp from startling start to disturbing finish.