Septic Man

★½☆☆ – (2013) – A man searching for the end to a viral outbreak becomes trapped in a sewer by a giant and his evil brother. Has a gleefully vile opening scene that only opens the door to the sheer boredom that follows. Grisly throughout, but otherwise offers nothing that isn’t disgusting (i.e. a point).

Right at Your Door

★★½☆ – (2006) – After a toxic attack in Los Angeles, a woman returns home and finds herself locked out by her husband. Gets off to a tense start involving the distant assault, then settles into some illogical and mundane patterns. The final act, however, builds on emotion before slapping you across the face with one hell of an unexpected finish.

Raw

★★★☆ – (2016) – A freshman in college is hazed into eating meat, and steadily grows a hunger for human flesh. A far-from-standard story that never fully explains itself, which only fuels the intrigue. Some scenes of violence are hard to watch, while the story takes hold early on and never lets go.

Mayhem

★★☆☆ – (2017) – An already dysfunctional office becomes a violent free for all when the staff is infected by a virus that feeds on emotion. Offers a unique spin on a tired infection genre, but still has too many typical areas. Wears thin by the mid-point, and tends to drag as events become more predictable.

Trouble Every Day

★★½☆ – (2001) – Newlyweds honeymoon in an area where a woman is eating people and a doctor who might know why disappeared. Has a deliberately slow pace and never identifies what it’s about, yet manages to hold attention through some grisly and sexually charged moments. An atypical structure further enhances the confusing creepiness.

It Comes at Night

★★★☆ – (2017) – Two small parties try to outlast a deadly virus and, ultimately, each other. A subdued affair that builds on dread despite not having many inclusions of the infected. Has strong character moments, scenes of high intensity, and ends on a powerfully haunting note.

Train to Busan

★★☆☆ – (2016) – A father accompanies his daughter to see her mother while a viral outbreak turns humans into bloodthirsty killers. Yet another not-quite-a-zombie yarn that might as well be called 28 Days Later on a Train. Does have some credible character moments and scenarios, but the been-there-done-that vibe turns attempted emotions into schmaltz.