★½☆☆ – (1991) – After taking on military personnel, zombie soldiers infiltrate a group of campers. A total bore that promises action but only delivers one sleepy groan after another. There’s no humor, no excitement, and no character who stands out as anything but a stiff with a pulse.

Devil’s Express

★★☆☆ – (1976) – A demon is killing people beneath NYC, and rival gangs are taking the blame. Has enough scenes of badly staged martial arts to hold some attention, but even with all the fighting this doesn’t take long to start dragging. The monster activity isn’t too bad, but there isn’t enough of it to go around.

The Most Dangerous Game

★★½☆ – (1932) – A man who’s stranded on an infamous island is hunted for sport by the island’s owner. Only runs 63-minutes, but seems to take forever getting to the hunt. While most of this consists of lumbering dialog, the final third does have great atmosphere and innovative camera work.

Raw Force

★★½☆ – (1982) – Nazis lure the women of a martial arts crew to an island where the dead consume females to survive. A strange and bombastic blend of fighting among humans and zombies that tosses in a ton of nudity along the way. Gets tiring after a while, and the low-level humor tends to kill the fun, but it’s nearly impossible to look away from.

Mighty Peking Man

★★☆☆ – (1977) – A giant ape is brought to a major city as an attraction, to the dismay of the blonde bombshell he raised. Not unlike any other King Kong knockoff, but this one stands above the others for its overall absurdity and explosive violence. Drags at times, but is ultimately a fun time killer.


★★☆☆ – (2017) – An already dysfunctional office becomes a violent free for all when the staff is infected by a virus that feeds on emotion. Offers a unique spin on a tired infection genre, but still has too many typical areas. Wears thin by the mid-point, and tends to drag as events become more predictable.

Breakdown Lane

★½☆☆ – (2017) – A woman with car issues becomes stranded in a vacant area where the living dead outnumber the living. While this does attempt a variety of action and horror scenes, they’re so badly constructed it’s often hard to tell what the overall point is. Whitney Moore is easy on the eyes, but the rest of this is rather repugnant.