A Ghost Story

★★½☆ – (2017) – A man who dies avoids the great beyond and settles into his house where life passes him by. A quietly compelling experience that’s unlike any other film dealing with death, though some scenes would fare better if fast forwarded through. Unique in its subtle design, but in the end doesn’t punch hard enough emotionally to consider more than a moderate art house success.

Clowntergeist

★★☆☆ – (2017) – A girl who’s afraid of clowns is haunted by the ghostly form of one. Hard to condemn since it tries to have commendable characters and horrific moments, yet the payoff is lost to confusion in the skittish plot. Rather stupid and annoying, and the villain isn’t exactly menacing.

Honeymoon (2014)

★★★☆ – (2014) – Newlyweds vacationing in secluded woods run into trouble when the wife begins acting irrationally after strange marks appear on her body. Starts off a tad too cutesy, but gradually builds into something where anything cute has no place. A strange, gripping tale with unusual and tense advancements.

Ghost House

★½☆☆ – (2017) – An engaged couple visiting Thailand become haunted by the ghost they inadvertently piss off. While strives for horror and meaning are presented, each and every occurrence has been put to better effect in superior films. The drama is stiff while the terror often comes across as comical.

The Ghoul (2016)

★½☆☆ – (2016) – A man in therapy tries to deal with his own conditions while socializing with sketchy people. The plot aims for intrigue in structure and tone, but the pace is too slow and the acting too hammy to pull it off. Has parts that aren’t bad, but as a whole ultimately aims for more shocks than meaning.

It (2017)

★★★☆ – (2017) – A group of kids are haunted by a shape-shifting clown when not hounded by bullies. Works incredibly well by presenting personable characters amid horrifying situations (with too much CGI). Mostly leaves adults out of the mix, which is a bit distracting, but does allow us to focus on the camaraderie among the leads, which results in an emotionally satisfying outcome. Pennywise, in his few scenes, is highly effective.

Trouble Every Day

★★½☆ – (2001) – Newlyweds honeymoon in an area where a woman is eating people and a doctor who might know why disappeared. Has a deliberately slow pace and never identifies what it’s about, yet manages to hold attention through some grisly and sexually charged moments. An atypical structure further enhances the confusing creepiness.

Jackals

★½☆☆ – (2017) – A family steals their brainwashed son from a cult, but the cult desperately wants him back. Never proves the family is close enough that saving one of their own should be such a high priority, as nobody seems to like one another. The whole scenario is a lose-lose situation that turns out exactly as expected.

Peelers

★★½☆ – (2016) – Strip club patrons infected by a black ooze make serious trouble for strippers and their companions. Though nothing entirely unique occurs, this does provide ample nudity, ample violence, and ample fun. Colorful characters and some genuine humor render this an imperfectly good time.